Minneapolis Community Indicators

Thank you for visiting the Minneapolis Community Indicators Project. The engagement period for this project is now closed. Over the next few weeks, City staff will review the ideas, comments and votes submitted and work with City Boards and Commissions to develop measures around the most popular themes.

Once this work is completed, all who registered on this site will receive an email that will include the draft measures and next steps. If you have not registered but want to receive this email, please contact kim.keller@minneapolismn.gov.

Learn more about the Community Indicators Project

Get more information about the City's adopted mission, values, goals and strategic directions.

Living Well

Submitted by (@patrickhanlon)

More trees: success defined by a healthy tree canopy

We will be losing 260,000+ trees to emerald asher borer. Trees need to be planted on boulevards, park land, residential, and commercial properties now to maintain our current air quality, water quality, and other lesser known benefits such as energy efficiency in buildings and carbon retention provided by this significant amount of trees.

Voting

128 votes
138 up votes
10 down votes
Active

A Hub of Economic Activity & Innovation

Submitted by (@patrickhanlon)

Incentives available to green/clean/sustainably minded businesss

Continue to make incentives available to businesses, with fees that they pay, for innovative clean technology projects that result in measurably cleaner communities, stronger businesses and healthier working conditions. Leverage investments that are mutually beneficial to businesses and their surrounding communities (ie. especially in areas of inequity). Auto body shops, dry cleaners, printers, plating companies, foundries, ...more »

Voting

107 votes
118 up votes
11 down votes
Active

One Minneapolis

Submitted by (@c.twitter)

Make Cannabis the Lowest Level Law Enforcement Priority

Making cannabis the lowest level law enforcement priority is one way to greatly reduce racial arrest disparities. In October 2014, the ACLU released a report showing that African Americans are 11.5 times more likely to be arrested in Minneapolis for cannabis possession than whites. [1] While possession of 1.5 ounces (42.5g) of cannabis is currently a petty misdemeanor in Minnesota, the fact that it is a criminal citation ...more »

Voting

104 votes
110 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Living Well

Submitted by (@janineloureyryan)

Aging in Place

Provide Aging in Place resources to support our senior community and to enable them to stay in their homes and neighborhoods. This includes funding for retrofitting homes with hand rails, ramping, etc. to make them safe.

Voting

86 votes
96 up votes
10 down votes
Active

A Hub of Economic Activity & Innovation

Submitted by

Excellent schools and education

For Minneapolis to be a really great city, make sure we have the best schools in the world. When the schools are top notch, people, jobs, and committed citizens will follow. We should be measured against the best schools in the world, not just the in the US. Provide flexibility and incentives for our schools to win in that comparison.

Voting

83 votes
88 up votes
5 down votes
Active

Living Well

Submitted by (@robingarwood)

Healthy food access

Ensure that all Minneapolis residents, regardless of location, income level and race, have access to healthy, affordable, and culturally appropriate food.

Voting

75 votes
94 up votes
19 down votes
Active

Living Well

Submitted by (@communitymember)

Housing for all needs

We have housing that is affordable and meets a variety of needs: seniors aging in place, young families, households with extended family living together

Voting

68 votes
74 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Great Places

Submitted by

More complete streets = sustainable + stronger communities

We need a more comprehensive approach to the redevelopment of streets. We need to develop more emphasis on walking, biking, public transit, community and local commerce. If we don't start becoming more intentional about limiting the growing presence of automobiles on our streets, we'll see more traffic congestion, wider roads, more pollution and residents with little-to-no connection with the neighborhood in which ...more »

Voting

67 votes
76 up votes
9 down votes
Active